Super Mario Party Review – Friend And Foe Unite. Anyone who’s played a Mario Party game in the past 20 years has a good idea of what to expect from Switch’s Super Mario Party, but Nintendo’s latest offers a few new modes that each add their own creative spin on the tried-and-true formula. In many ways, Super Mario Party feels smaller than previous games in the series, but added layers of strategy and clever, fun minigames help keep it lively and fresh.

The fierce competitive nature of the series’ earliest titles is back, as Super Mario Party ditches Mario Party 9 and 10’s cooperative car mechanic and once again pits players against each other in a race for Stars. The overall goal in Super Mario Party is to earn five Gems, which you get after completing each of the game’s five major offline modes: Mario Party, Partner Party, Challenge Road, River Survival, and Sound Stage.

Mario Party mode features the series’ classic formula of bite-sized games interspersed between rounds of board game hijinks. Your character is still placed on a board with three others where you’ll all race after Toadette and her collection of Stars. The biggest change is the introduction of character dice blocks; while previous Mario Party games utilized virtual 10-sided dice, now every character has two dice blocks, one six-sided and the other unique to them, and you have to decide which one to use each turn. The six-sided die rolls a one through six, while each character die comes with its own set of strengths and weaknesses.

Super Mario Party Review - Friend And Foe Unite

For example, Mario’s has a number three on three of its sides, while the remaining three sides are one, five, and six. In comparison, the devilish gambler Wario has a special die where two of the sides cause him to lose two coins, but the other four sides are sixes. For the first time in a Mario Party game, your choice of character is more than just aesthetic, and figuring out the best time to use a specific dice block adds a level of strategy to what’s typically been an act of randomness.

Each of the game’s four boards requires slight tweaks to your strategy for reaching the Star, but they’re all small, and most don’t take advantage of their unique makeups. Whomp’s Domino Ruins, for example, features Whomps who will block your path down certain shortcuts. The board only has two Whomps, though, so you don’t encounter them very often, and even when you do, the board is small enough that taking the long way around won’t put you at much of a disadvantage. Super Mario Party’s four boards don’t feel distinct, so your strategy for each one won’t be all that different. And since there are only four boards in total to pick from, Mario Party mode grows stale fairly quickly.

There are a total of 80 minigames in Super Mario Party, putting it just behind Mario Party 6, 7, and 9 in terms of quantity. Of the 80 minigames, nearly half rely on the motion control or rumble features in the Switch’s Joy-Cons. Don’t fret; both the motion and rumble features work surprisingly well, and it makes for some of the most cleverly designed games in the Mario Party series. For example, in Fiddler on the Hoof, you and three others race horses, and making a pulling back motion with the Joy-Con to simulate whipping the reins increases your score if you move with the beat of the song that’s playing. In Nut Cases, you and a partner need to outwit the other team by claiming the five boxes that have the most walnuts inside them. You get an idea as to a box’s contents by picking it up and measuring the severity of your Joy-Con’s vibration. As Super Mario Party only supports motion control with a single Joy-Con, you won’t be able to play the game in handheld mode or with a Pro Controller.

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